sassydragon:

sassydragon:

but imagine if we had tiny little dragons

the size of puppies

and they would go wherever we went sitting on our shoulders and hissing at everyone who tried to touch you because you’re their most special thing in the universe and they are so tiny it’s ridiculously cute

the fact that this post has more notes than i ever expected makes me really glad 

destielkills:

the-secret-world-of-hairy-yetis:

capitolprostitute:

nationalbuttlickersassociation:

hachestark:

samuel-vimes:

honestlyiamironman:

didn’t the goblet of fire cover this

because how else would Ireland win but krum catch the snitch

actually in prisoner of Azkaban, didn’t Gryffindor need a certain amount of points to proceed to the finals, and that’s why Oliver Wood told Harry to wait until they had scored a certain amount of points before he caught the snitch?

Catching the snitch ends the game and is worth the most points, but it doesn’t guarantee a win. Just like tumblr user samuel-vimes said, Krum caught the snitch at the World Cup Finals, but Ireland still won in the end because they still had more points.

Also the way the ranking system works in the international quidditch league, and I assume at Hogwarts, according to JK Rowlings new reveal, is that teams are awarded a certain amount of points based on the amount of points a team wins by and thats how they are ranked against each other. Rowling said that a win by 150 points = 5 points, 100 points = 3 points, 50 points = 1 point, and a winner of a tie is whoever caught the snitch the quickest. So theoretically a team that only catches the snitch but wins by a margin of less than 50 points is awarded no points and might as well of not caught thats why Wood told Harry to wait until they were up a certain number of points in order to increase their overall ranking and win the cup.

And gosh, a good chunk of you people claim to hate sports.

We do hate sports. All the ones that don’t involve flying broomsticks and slightly murderous balls that try to knock you off them.
destielkills:

the-secret-world-of-hairy-yetis:

capitolprostitute:

nationalbuttlickersassociation:

hachestark:

samuel-vimes:

honestlyiamironman:

didn’t the goblet of fire cover this

because how else would Ireland win but krum catch the snitch

actually in prisoner of Azkaban, didn’t Gryffindor need a certain amount of points to proceed to the finals, and that’s why Oliver Wood told Harry to wait until they had scored a certain amount of points before he caught the snitch?

Catching the snitch ends the game and is worth the most points, but it doesn’t guarantee a win. Just like tumblr user samuel-vimes said, Krum caught the snitch at the World Cup Finals, but Ireland still won in the end because they still had more points.

Also the way the ranking system works in the international quidditch league, and I assume at Hogwarts, according to JK Rowlings new reveal, is that teams are awarded a certain amount of points based on the amount of points a team wins by and thats how they are ranked against each other. Rowling said that a win by 150 points = 5 points, 100 points = 3 points, 50 points = 1 point, and a winner of a tie is whoever caught the snitch the quickest. So theoretically a team that only catches the snitch but wins by a margin of less than 50 points is awarded no points and might as well of not caught thats why Wood told Harry to wait until they were up a certain number of points in order to increase their overall ranking and win the cup.

And gosh, a good chunk of you people claim to hate sports.

We do hate sports. All the ones that don’t involve flying broomsticks and slightly murderous balls that try to knock you off them.

destielkills:

the-secret-world-of-hairy-yetis:

capitolprostitute:

nationalbuttlickersassociation:

hachestark:

samuel-vimes:

honestlyiamironman:

didn’t the goblet of fire cover this

because how else would Ireland win but krum catch the snitch

actually in prisoner of Azkaban, didn’t Gryffindor need a certain amount of points to proceed to the finals, and that’s why Oliver Wood told Harry to wait until they had scored a certain amount of points before he caught the snitch?

Catching the snitch ends the game and is worth the most points, but it doesn’t guarantee a win. Just like tumblr user samuel-vimes said, Krum caught the snitch at the World Cup Finals, but Ireland still won in the end because they still had more points.

Also the way the ranking system works in the international quidditch league, and I assume at Hogwarts, according to JK Rowlings new reveal, is that teams are awarded a certain amount of points based on the amount of points a team wins by and thats how they are ranked against each other. Rowling said that a win by 150 points = 5 points, 100 points = 3 points, 50 points = 1 point, and a winner of a tie is whoever caught the snitch the quickest. So theoretically a team that only catches the snitch but wins by a margin of less than 50 points is awarded no points and might as well of not caught thats why Wood told Harry to wait until they were up a certain number of points in order to increase their overall ranking and win the cup.

And gosh, a good chunk of you people claim to hate sports.

We do hate sports. All the ones that don’t involve flying broomsticks and slightly murderous balls that try to knock you off them.

nixonsshades:

*sees attractive person of the same gender*

I’M GOING GAY

image

generic-art:


5-Year-Old With Autism Paints Stunning Masterpieces 
Autism is a poorly-understood neurological disorder that can impair an individual’s ability to engage in various social interactions. But little 5-year-old Iris Grace in the UK is an excellent example of the unexpected gifts that autism can also grant – her exceptional focus and attention to detail have helped her create incredibly beautiful paintings that many of her fans (and buyers) have likened to Monet’s works.
Little Iris is slowly learning to speak, whereas most children have already begun to speak at least a few words by age 2. Along with speech therapy, her parents gradually introduced her to painting, which is when they discovered her amazing talent.
“We have been encouraging Iris to paint to help with speech therapy, joint attention and turn taking,” her mother, Arabella Carter-Johnson, explains on her website. “Then we realised that she is actually really talented and has an incredible concentration span of around 2 hours each time she paints. Her autism has created a style of painting which I have never seen in a child of her age, she has an understanding of colours and how they interact with each other.”

Much better version of the same subject matter I posted earlier.
generic-art:


5-Year-Old With Autism Paints Stunning Masterpieces 
Autism is a poorly-understood neurological disorder that can impair an individual’s ability to engage in various social interactions. But little 5-year-old Iris Grace in the UK is an excellent example of the unexpected gifts that autism can also grant – her exceptional focus and attention to detail have helped her create incredibly beautiful paintings that many of her fans (and buyers) have likened to Monet’s works.
Little Iris is slowly learning to speak, whereas most children have already begun to speak at least a few words by age 2. Along with speech therapy, her parents gradually introduced her to painting, which is when they discovered her amazing talent.
“We have been encouraging Iris to paint to help with speech therapy, joint attention and turn taking,” her mother, Arabella Carter-Johnson, explains on her website. “Then we realised that she is actually really talented and has an incredible concentration span of around 2 hours each time she paints. Her autism has created a style of painting which I have never seen in a child of her age, she has an understanding of colours and how they interact with each other.”

Much better version of the same subject matter I posted earlier.
generic-art:


5-Year-Old With Autism Paints Stunning Masterpieces 
Autism is a poorly-understood neurological disorder that can impair an individual’s ability to engage in various social interactions. But little 5-year-old Iris Grace in the UK is an excellent example of the unexpected gifts that autism can also grant – her exceptional focus and attention to detail have helped her create incredibly beautiful paintings that many of her fans (and buyers) have likened to Monet’s works.
Little Iris is slowly learning to speak, whereas most children have already begun to speak at least a few words by age 2. Along with speech therapy, her parents gradually introduced her to painting, which is when they discovered her amazing talent.
“We have been encouraging Iris to paint to help with speech therapy, joint attention and turn taking,” her mother, Arabella Carter-Johnson, explains on her website. “Then we realised that she is actually really talented and has an incredible concentration span of around 2 hours each time she paints. Her autism has created a style of painting which I have never seen in a child of her age, she has an understanding of colours and how they interact with each other.”

Much better version of the same subject matter I posted earlier.
generic-art:


5-Year-Old With Autism Paints Stunning Masterpieces 
Autism is a poorly-understood neurological disorder that can impair an individual’s ability to engage in various social interactions. But little 5-year-old Iris Grace in the UK is an excellent example of the unexpected gifts that autism can also grant – her exceptional focus and attention to detail have helped her create incredibly beautiful paintings that many of her fans (and buyers) have likened to Monet’s works.
Little Iris is slowly learning to speak, whereas most children have already begun to speak at least a few words by age 2. Along with speech therapy, her parents gradually introduced her to painting, which is when they discovered her amazing talent.
“We have been encouraging Iris to paint to help with speech therapy, joint attention and turn taking,” her mother, Arabella Carter-Johnson, explains on her website. “Then we realised that she is actually really talented and has an incredible concentration span of around 2 hours each time she paints. Her autism has created a style of painting which I have never seen in a child of her age, she has an understanding of colours and how they interact with each other.”

Much better version of the same subject matter I posted earlier.
generic-art:


5-Year-Old With Autism Paints Stunning Masterpieces 
Autism is a poorly-understood neurological disorder that can impair an individual’s ability to engage in various social interactions. But little 5-year-old Iris Grace in the UK is an excellent example of the unexpected gifts that autism can also grant – her exceptional focus and attention to detail have helped her create incredibly beautiful paintings that many of her fans (and buyers) have likened to Monet’s works.
Little Iris is slowly learning to speak, whereas most children have already begun to speak at least a few words by age 2. Along with speech therapy, her parents gradually introduced her to painting, which is when they discovered her amazing talent.
“We have been encouraging Iris to paint to help with speech therapy, joint attention and turn taking,” her mother, Arabella Carter-Johnson, explains on her website. “Then we realised that she is actually really talented and has an incredible concentration span of around 2 hours each time she paints. Her autism has created a style of painting which I have never seen in a child of her age, she has an understanding of colours and how they interact with each other.”

Much better version of the same subject matter I posted earlier.
generic-art:


5-Year-Old With Autism Paints Stunning Masterpieces 
Autism is a poorly-understood neurological disorder that can impair an individual’s ability to engage in various social interactions. But little 5-year-old Iris Grace in the UK is an excellent example of the unexpected gifts that autism can also grant – her exceptional focus and attention to detail have helped her create incredibly beautiful paintings that many of her fans (and buyers) have likened to Monet’s works.
Little Iris is slowly learning to speak, whereas most children have already begun to speak at least a few words by age 2. Along with speech therapy, her parents gradually introduced her to painting, which is when they discovered her amazing talent.
“We have been encouraging Iris to paint to help with speech therapy, joint attention and turn taking,” her mother, Arabella Carter-Johnson, explains on her website. “Then we realised that she is actually really talented and has an incredible concentration span of around 2 hours each time she paints. Her autism has created a style of painting which I have never seen in a child of her age, she has an understanding of colours and how they interact with each other.”

Much better version of the same subject matter I posted earlier.
generic-art:


5-Year-Old With Autism Paints Stunning Masterpieces 
Autism is a poorly-understood neurological disorder that can impair an individual’s ability to engage in various social interactions. But little 5-year-old Iris Grace in the UK is an excellent example of the unexpected gifts that autism can also grant – her exceptional focus and attention to detail have helped her create incredibly beautiful paintings that many of her fans (and buyers) have likened to Monet’s works.
Little Iris is slowly learning to speak, whereas most children have already begun to speak at least a few words by age 2. Along with speech therapy, her parents gradually introduced her to painting, which is when they discovered her amazing talent.
“We have been encouraging Iris to paint to help with speech therapy, joint attention and turn taking,” her mother, Arabella Carter-Johnson, explains on her website. “Then we realised that she is actually really talented and has an incredible concentration span of around 2 hours each time she paints. Her autism has created a style of painting which I have never seen in a child of her age, she has an understanding of colours and how they interact with each other.”

Much better version of the same subject matter I posted earlier.
generic-art:


5-Year-Old With Autism Paints Stunning Masterpieces 
Autism is a poorly-understood neurological disorder that can impair an individual’s ability to engage in various social interactions. But little 5-year-old Iris Grace in the UK is an excellent example of the unexpected gifts that autism can also grant – her exceptional focus and attention to detail have helped her create incredibly beautiful paintings that many of her fans (and buyers) have likened to Monet’s works.
Little Iris is slowly learning to speak, whereas most children have already begun to speak at least a few words by age 2. Along with speech therapy, her parents gradually introduced her to painting, which is when they discovered her amazing talent.
“We have been encouraging Iris to paint to help with speech therapy, joint attention and turn taking,” her mother, Arabella Carter-Johnson, explains on her website. “Then we realised that she is actually really talented and has an incredible concentration span of around 2 hours each time she paints. Her autism has created a style of painting which I have never seen in a child of her age, she has an understanding of colours and how they interact with each other.”

Much better version of the same subject matter I posted earlier.
generic-art:


5-Year-Old With Autism Paints Stunning Masterpieces 
Autism is a poorly-understood neurological disorder that can impair an individual’s ability to engage in various social interactions. But little 5-year-old Iris Grace in the UK is an excellent example of the unexpected gifts that autism can also grant – her exceptional focus and attention to detail have helped her create incredibly beautiful paintings that many of her fans (and buyers) have likened to Monet’s works.
Little Iris is slowly learning to speak, whereas most children have already begun to speak at least a few words by age 2. Along with speech therapy, her parents gradually introduced her to painting, which is when they discovered her amazing talent.
“We have been encouraging Iris to paint to help with speech therapy, joint attention and turn taking,” her mother, Arabella Carter-Johnson, explains on her website. “Then we realised that she is actually really talented and has an incredible concentration span of around 2 hours each time she paints. Her autism has created a style of painting which I have never seen in a child of her age, she has an understanding of colours and how they interact with each other.”

Much better version of the same subject matter I posted earlier.
generic-art:


5-Year-Old With Autism Paints Stunning Masterpieces 
Autism is a poorly-understood neurological disorder that can impair an individual’s ability to engage in various social interactions. But little 5-year-old Iris Grace in the UK is an excellent example of the unexpected gifts that autism can also grant – her exceptional focus and attention to detail have helped her create incredibly beautiful paintings that many of her fans (and buyers) have likened to Monet’s works.
Little Iris is slowly learning to speak, whereas most children have already begun to speak at least a few words by age 2. Along with speech therapy, her parents gradually introduced her to painting, which is when they discovered her amazing talent.
“We have been encouraging Iris to paint to help with speech therapy, joint attention and turn taking,” her mother, Arabella Carter-Johnson, explains on her website. “Then we realised that she is actually really talented and has an incredible concentration span of around 2 hours each time she paints. Her autism has created a style of painting which I have never seen in a child of her age, she has an understanding of colours and how they interact with each other.”

Much better version of the same subject matter I posted earlier.

generic-art:

5-Year-Old With Autism Paints Stunning Masterpieces 

Autism is a poorly-understood neurological disorder that can impair an individual’s ability to engage in various social interactions. But little 5-year-old Iris Grace in the UK is an excellent example of the unexpected gifts that autism can also grant – her exceptional focus and attention to detail have helped her create incredibly beautiful paintings that many of her fans (and buyers) have likened to Monet’s works.

Little Iris is slowly learning to speak, whereas most children have already begun to speak at least a few words by age 2. Along with speech therapy, her parents gradually introduced her to painting, which is when they discovered her amazing talent.

“We have been encouraging Iris to paint to help with speech therapy, joint attention and turn taking,” her mother, Arabella Carter-Johnson, explains on her website. “Then we realised that she is actually really talented and has an incredible concentration span of around 2 hours each time she paints. Her autism has created a style of painting which I have never seen in a child of her age, she has an understanding of colours and how they interact with each other.”

Much better version of the same subject matter I posted earlier.

madelinashton:


Scarlett Johansson + Tumblr


Inspired by x and x
madelinashton:


Scarlett Johansson + Tumblr


Inspired by x and x
madelinashton:


Scarlett Johansson + Tumblr


Inspired by x and x
madelinashton:


Scarlett Johansson + Tumblr


Inspired by x and x
madelinashton:


Scarlett Johansson + Tumblr


Inspired by x and x
madelinashton:


Scarlett Johansson + Tumblr


Inspired by x and x

madelinashton:

Scarlett Johansson + Tumblr

Inspired by x and x

guys please, I cannot answer all 0 messages

daredeuil:

the art of shushing by tony stark.
daredeuil:

the art of shushing by tony stark.

daredeuil:

the art of shushing by tony stark.

cyberho:

Steal her look: Lady gaga’s meat dress
Walmart’s Cargill Chuck 80/20 Ground Beef, 2.25 lb ( $9,71 ) 
cyberho:

Steal her look: Lady gaga’s meat dress
Walmart’s Cargill Chuck 80/20 Ground Beef, 2.25 lb ( $9,71 ) 

cyberho:

Steal her look: Lady gaga’s meat dress

  • Walmart’s Cargill Chuck 80/20 Ground Beef, 2.25 lb ( $9,71 ) 
"I didn’t want to sleep. I never wanted to sleep these days. Then I didn’t want to wake up. I didn’t want the leaves turning, the nights turning dark early."
Louise Glück, Radium (via larmoyante)
"Love isn’t soft, like those poets say. Love has teeth which bite and the wounds never close."
Stephen King, The Body (via larmoyante)
imsirius:

What’s your favourite swear word?
imsirius:

What’s your favourite swear word?
imsirius:

What’s your favourite swear word?
imsirius:

What’s your favourite swear word?

imsirius:

What’s your favourite swear word?